People

A list of The Votives Project authors, friends and collaborators. Visit The Votives Project Facebook group to find more news of our various publications and projects.

Laura Aho, University of Helsinki (Finland). I am a doctoral student in Classics writing my dissertation on Greek and Roman votive inscriptions, more precisely, on how the reasons for the votive offerings are expressed in the inscription, in the text and/or picture form. The working title of my dissertation is “Occasions and motives for sacred dedications in antiquity”. The first part will analyse the vocabulary and syntax of the inscriptions, and pictorial representations, whilst the second part will concentrate on an historical and qualitative analysis of votive practice in the Greco-Roman world. My Master’s thesis concentrated on the votive inscriptions dedicated to Asclepius and their role in the cult.

Igor Baglioni, Museo delle Religioni “Raffaele Pettazzoni” di Velletri (Rome). I am currently studying the archaeological and literary evidence for ex-votos offered to Diana of Aricia. This work forms part of a broader research project which reassesses the goddess cults discussed by J.G. Frazer in his 1890 book The Golden Bough, in the light of the latest archaeological finds and using modern methodologies developed in the fields of anthropology and the history of religions.

Eleanor Betts, The Open University, UK. I’m interested in putting votives back in their context. Where and how were they used in the sacred landscape of Iron Age and Roman Italy? My particular interest is in Italic votives from the Marche and North Abruzzo regions of Italy (Iron Age Picenum).

Velia Boecker, Freie University Berlin. After not pursuing a surgical career I studied Classical Archaeology at the Universities of Cologne and Berlin. I have tried to specialise in the ancient treatment of illness and health wherever possible and graduated in 2010 on surgeons, ophthalmologists and gynaecologists in the Roman Empire. I am currently working on my doctoral thesis – funded by the Gerda Henkel-Foundation and located at the Freie Universität Berlin – where I am researching the dedication of anatomical votives in the sanctuaries of Latium (Central Italy).

Domenica Borriello, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli (SUN). My research focuses on ex-votos and votive shrines in the region of Campania. I have published widely on this topic, and I am currently finishing an article which looks at the iconographic and written archival evidence for healing miracles (grazie ricevute) in Campania during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Anne-Lieke Brem, University of Groningen (Netherlands). I am a student studying Research Masters Archaeology (Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology) and Masters Cultural Geography (Heritage and Place Identities). My general interest lies in the (theoretical) combination of both of these subjects and my most recent research focuses on the social landscape of illness and disease in ancient Greece (500-200 BC). The start of my research has been published as part of a compulsory course of our Masters programme: Brem, A., 2016. Social inequality and spatial segregation: the social landscape of ill/diseased versus healthy people in ancient Greece. In: Raemaekers, D.C.M. (ed) Past landscapes revisited. Eelde: Barkhuis, pp. 103-108.

Romina Carboni, University of Cagliari. Most of my work consists of studying votive offerings from ancient Sardinia, especially those linked to harvest and sanatio cults. My votives-related publications include the book Res Sacrae. Culti e rituali nella Sardegna romana. My work focuses too on the coroplastic finds from the Punic-Roman site of Nora (south Sardinia), that is still being investigated.

Peter Dziedzic, DePaul University alumnus. I just completed a Fulbright grant studying Sufism in Fez, Morocco. Among my interests are the practices of pilgrimage and saint veneration in the Islamic tradition. I will soon expand my research on these phenomena to other parts of the Islamic world. I eventually hope to pursue comparative work on sainthood in Christianity and Islam. Posts on TVP: The City of Saints.

Fondazione Per Grazie Ricevute We are an Italian foundation dedicated to the study of painted ex votos. We organise exhibitions of our own private collection of votives, with the aim of making this phenomenon better known to the wider public, not only to academics. Posts about Fondazione PGR: Our Daily Bread and An exhibition of ex votos in Milan.

Emma-Jayne Graham (network co-founder), The Open University, UK. I work on votive offerings from ancient Italy, especially swaddled infant and anatomical ex-votos. This reflects my broader interests in the ancient body, material culture, religion and embodied identities. My publications include articles about swaddled baby votives and a forthcoming co-edited volume on approaches to ancient anatomical votives. Posts on TVP: Shadowy figures, Wombs and tombs, Waxing lyrical on the materiality of votives, Objects and Remembering, Votives and conflict, Votives and conflict: postscript, Votives on display (Part 1), Votives on display (Part 2), Votive efficacy, Votive visions of the body, Are curse tablets votives?.

Evy Johanne Håland is a Norwegian Researcher, Dr.art. (PhD) History.  Since 1983, I have had several periods of fieldwork in the Mediterranean, mainly in Greece and Italy, where I have also been conducting research on religious festivals and life-cycle rituals since 1987. My monographs and many articles combine fieldwork results with ancient sources, inter alia, focusing on votive gifts both in modern and ancient societies. My next project on health and healing in Greek tradition plans to take a closer look on the importance of votive gifts.

Jenny Högström Berntson, University of Gothenburg. I am a PhD student in history of religions at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. In my thesis I discuss how votive gifts can reflect gendered norms and activities.

Ceri Houlbrook, University of Manchester, University of Hertfordshire. My main research interest is in the archaeology and heritage of contemporary deposits which emphasise the blurry distinction between ‘ritual’ and ‘secular’. My thesis – and subsequent journal articles – focused on coin-trees in the British Isles, and I’m currently researching the global phenomenon of love-locks. I’m particularly interested in the deposit’s capacity to act as metaphor of the depositor. Posts on TVP: Love locks: votive deposits or destructive vandalism?

Jessica Hughes (network co-founder), The Open University, UK. I work mainly on anatomical offerings from antiquity, but I also have a keen interest in votives from later periods, especially Catholic Italy. My votives-related publications include a forthcoming book ‘The Anatomy of Ritual: Votive Body Parts from Greco-Roman antiquity’. Posts by Jessica: Tap and Pray’, Films and stones, Votive chickens, Graffiti as ex-voto?, Yves Klein’s ex-voto to St Rita of Cascia, Votives as ‘Self Evidence’The Festival of the Madonna dell’ArcoEx votes in Pompeii – an interview with Monsignor Pietro Caggiano

Philip Kiernan, University at Buffalo. Most of my research is on the material culture of Roman religion. In 2009, I published a book on Miniature Votive Offerings from Romano-Celtic sanctuary sites, and have written articles on the relationship between lead curse tablets and the Roman procedure of the vow. My current book project is on idols in the Roman west.

Andreas M. Murgan, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. My research focuses mainly on early money (lumps, chunks and bars) from sites in ancient Italy and Sicily. For these finds I conduct a detailed analysis of their archaeological contexts, aiming to reconstruct and best understand their original deposition. Since the material and such-like objects were often dedicated to the gods, sanctuaries constitute a fundamental source of information.Unfortunately, however, the material in question has been little studied, often considered unattractive lumps and chunks of metal. Therefore, any references concerning aes rude and the (incorrectly so-called) aes signatum (in context!) are highly appreciated! Posts on TVP: Describing Depositions.

Georgina Muskett, University of Liverpool. I am interested in the way in which votive offerings were used in the Greco-Roman world, as well as how museums in the UK formed their collections, the latter developed while I was Curator of Classical Antiquities for National Museums Liverpool. My most recent publication on this appeared in Annual of the British School at Athens (2014): ‘Votive offerings from the Sanctuary of Artemis Orthia, Sparta, in Liverpool collections.’

Caroline Perrée, Permanent researcher CEMCA UMIFRE 16 MAEDI CNRS. My research concerns forms of popular worship, in particular the ex-voto but also offerings more generally, as well as their interactions with contemporary art in terms of plasticity and iconography. I am particularly interested in contemporary offerings, the durability of the ex-voto through time, and urban cults such that of Santa Muerte in Mexico City. Despite focusing on Mexican ex-votos, my analyses adopt a comparative point of view, seeking to comprehend the votive in its diversity. At present I am studying rooms of ex-votos and their management by the Mexican clergy (see https://cemca.academia.edu/CarolinePerree).

Jessica Piccinini, University of Vienna, Austria. I am interested in the study of votive offerings as a means to understand the origins and socio-economic status of the worshippers of the major pan-Hellenic sanctuaries and to assess the routes of ancient pilgrimage in pre-Christian societies.

Gina Salapata, Massey University, New Zealand. I have an interest in the religious behaviour of everyday Greek people, especially choice of votive offerings. My research focuses on terracotta relief plaques from the southern Peloponnese and my book, Heroic Offerings: The Terracotta Plaques from the Spartan Sanctuary of Agamemnon and Kassandra (University of Michigan Press, 2015), has just been published. Posts on TVP: Multiple votive offerings.

Konrad Siekierski, University of Leipzig and National Academy of Sciences of Armenia. I am a cultural anthropologist working on modern Armenian religiosity, in particular on pilgrimage and sacred places. Working on this topic I come across various form of votive practices – from the very word ‘pilgrimage’ (ukhtagnatsutyun) which in Armenian language derives from ‘vow’ (ukht), to animal sacrifice, to lighting candles and bringing pictures and books to pilgrimage sites.

Jacopo Tabolli, Director, MAVNA museum. Jacopo Tabolli received his Ph.D. in Archaeology from Sapienza University of Rome in 2012. Editor of Officina Etruscologia his first book on the necropoleis of Narce during the Early Iron Age and the Early Orientalizing Period appeared in 2013. In 2012 he founded the MAVNA museum in Mazzano Romano and since then he has been the scientific director of the museum. He has been excavating for several years at Veii and he is currently co-directing different excavation projects in the site of Narce at the sanctuary of Monte Li Santi-Le Rote and at the necropolis of Cavone di Monte Li Santi. He has been recently appointed as Visiting Researcher at the Long Room Hub Trinity College Dublin with a project entitled “Masked Identities” focused on the study of votive masks in pre-Roman Italy.

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, University of Pennsylvania MuseumMy study of Etruscan religion and medicine includes ancient anatomical models, particularly those that demonstrate perception of internal organs such as hearts and uteri; I also investigate the connections between observed natural phenomena and divination (cosmic rays and the Brontoscopic Calendar, parasites and divination by sheep liver, etc.). Posts on TVP: Etruscan votives and health?

Philippa Walton, University of Oxford/Piercebridge Project. I’m a Research Fellow on the Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire Project (Oxford), but also PI for an ongoing project to catalogue and analyse a large Romano-British riverine votive deposit from the River Tees at Piercebridge. I also currently work on how coinage was used at Romano-British temple sites and coin hoards found in theatres throughout the Roman empire.

Anne H Weiss, University of Pittsburgh. I am interested at present in women’s votive activities and in the performance/display of those activities as an elite family social and political strategy in Greece and central Italy/Rome. For more information, see my webpage on academia.edu.
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